M.S. IN HCI/d
CURRICULUM

HCI and design have intermingled for decades, with more aesthetic and studio-based practices influencing technical labs and vice-versa. Our program accelerates this two-way relationship. As a result, HCI/d blends social science, creativity,and technology.

 

First Year

Fall Intake (Prior Spring Semester)

Intro to HCI/d (Eli Blevis)

3 Credits

Goals
Practice creative and reflective response to a broad range of invited speakers on themes in HCI/d and/or themes synergistic with HCI/d research and practice.
Teaching Philosophy
Over years, my teaching philosophy has become increasingly minimalist. The core tenet is: Make sure that everyone in a class—that is each and every one—has equal time, invitation, and opportunity to speak, present, critique, facilitate, question, answer, and fully participate in every way in every detail.
Format of Weekly Classes
First Hour: An invited Speaker will present and/or lead a discussion relating to HCI/d in the perspective of her or his or their areas of expertice.
Second Hour: Students present and discuss projects inspired by the previous week’s discussion, facilitated by the Instructor(s) according to the teaching philosophy.

Foundations of HCI/d (Hamid Ekbia)

3 Credits

This course offers a survey overview of the field of Human-Computer Interaction. It introduces the main themes of HCI set generally in a historical context. The field of HCI is both yo20g and dynamic. Unlike more mature disciplines, such as Biology or English, HCI is still finding its intellectual identity and agenda. An interdisciplinary field, HCI reflects concerns, and draws on resources, from cognitive science, sociology, engineering, philosophy, design, and digital media studies. Even today, HCI is undergoing major intellectual shifts from an older paradigm of HCI that integrated the above disciplines to a newer paradigm that integrates design, humanistic, socio-economic, and environmental approaches. Much of Indiana University’s HCID professional Master’s curriculum reflects a forward look to the rising paradigm of HCI.
However, understanding HCI’s rising paradigm requires a holistic understanding of both the accomplishments (e.g., usability) and limitations of earlier paradigms. It also assumes some understanding of how the history of technology over the preceding decades has related to transitions in the field. It requires knowledge of significant design projects as exemplary outputs of HCI practice. Finally, it requires an understanding of how older approaches remain relevant and continue to inform newer approaches. “I542: Foundations of HCI” is just such a survey. Accordingly, the course is structured in three main modules around the three key components of HCI: technology, users, and designers. In addition to learning the course contents—surveying HCI research and practice domains, theories, and methods—this course also takes seriously students’ academic skills such as their competence to read and evaluate scholarly literature independently. Finally, this is not just a lecture course. It is a graduate seminar (albeit a crowded one). This course is about you coming into your own as an HCI practitioner. Accordingly, classes involve student-led discussions, and we will do whatever it takes to makes sure it stays so.

Course Objectives

  • Encounter and engage with the major conceptual themes and intellectual traditions of HCI since the 1980s;
  • Relate design practices to the broader socio-historical, economic, and political environment of their happening;
  • Develop a level of comfort and competence reading academic materials;
  • Improve your ability to develop your own intellectual positions and express them to others.

Elective

3 Credits

Students select an elective offered at the university graduate level. They continue to focus on design skills, spend more time doing research, explore hobbies, or learn technical skills like programming, VR and AR. Students have the choice to select from hundreds of courses offered outside of Informatics.

 

First Year

Spring Intake (Prior Fall Intake)

I543 Interaction Design Methods (Norman Su)

3 Credits

This class will cover the use of qualitative methods in HCI and UX research from data collection and analysis to "action" (for exploratory, communicative, evaluative, and generative goals). Methods covered will encompass ethnography (interviews and participant observations), grounded theory, thematic analysis, cultural probes, diary studies, and surveys. We will highlight current debates about qualitative research and how quantitative methods and qualitative methods can be complementary. This class will also feature guest speakers from industry who can speak to opportunities and challenges of doing UX research in organizations. Students will gain hands-on experience doing, analyzing, and communicating fieldwork (including virtual methods given the pandemic). The class will introduce common tools used by qualitative researchers.

I561 Meaning & Form in HCI/d (Eli Blevis)

3 Credits

In this studio-based class, students will learn to look at design through the lens of aesthetics. You will learn why should you bring art to everything you design. Students will understand the notion and use of still digital imagery as a material of interaction design, as information and technology. Students will learn techniques of digital image making, methods of visual thinking, ethnography and diagrammatic reasoning.

Elective

3 Credits

Students select an elective offered at the university graduate level. They continue to focus on design skills, spend more time doing research, explore hobbies, or learn technical skills like programming, VR and AR. Students have the choice to select from hundreds of courses offered outside of Informatics.

 

Second Year

Fall Semester

Capstone I OR Capstone I & II (Dana Habeeb and Andy Hunsucker)

3 Credits

The Capstone course represents the conclusion of the HCI/d professional Master’s program. In it, students pursue their own independent project, scaffolded by the course, including their peers. The Capstone project is each student’s opportunity to show—themselves, their peers, and potential employers—what they are capable of, both in conception and in execution.
The Capstone is the final valuation of each student as a designer with a professional Master’s Degree. It is the moment where students demonstrate what they are individually capable of, in a larger project, without the scaffolding of a traditional class and also without teammates. The projects are self-guided and self-led. Ultimately, each student is responsible for their success. However, the instructor team is available for critical feedback, to provide resources, and to help students move their work forward.

Electives (2)

6 Credits

Students select two electives offered university graduate level. They continue to focus on design skills, spend more time doing research, explore hobbies, or learn technical skills like programming, VR and AR. Students have the choice to select from hundreds of courses offered outside of Informatics.

 

Second Year

Spring Semester

Capstone II (Dana Habeeb and Andy Hunsucker)

3 Credits

The Capstone course represents the conclusion of the HCI/d professional Master’s program. In it, students pursue their own independent project, scaffolded by the course, including their peers. The Capstone project is each student’s opportunity to show—themselves, their peers, and potential employers—what they are capable of, both in conception and in execution.
The Capstone is the final valuation of each student as a designer with a professional Master’s Degree. It is the moment where students demonstrate what they are individually capable of, in a larger project, without the scaffolding of a traditional class and also without teammates. The projects are self-guided and self-led. Ultimately, each student is responsible for their success. However, the instructor team is available for critical feedback, to provide resources, and to help students move their work forward.

Electives (2)

6 Credits

Students select two electives offered at the university graduate level. They continue to focus on design skills, spend more time doing research, explore hobbies, or learn technical skills like programming, VR and AR. Students have the choice to select from hundreds of courses offered outside of Informatics.